Monday, March 30, 2009

Nasushiobara Market - Nasushiobara, Tochigi

One of our favorite things in Nasushiobara is the fruit market. Map Location



Most people think Japan is very expensive. But rural living, in a place like Tochigi, is actually quite cheap. The fruit market is a great example of this. Sometimes friends from Tokyo ask us to take them there to stock up on cheap fruit before returning.

We buy all our fruit and vegetables there. They have a wide variety of things, some local, some imported. Everything from apples to mangos, wasabi root to artichokes. (no durian). They also sell fruit gift boxes. In the back, there is a small supermarket. We don't buy so much in the supermarket, though we do buy quite a bit of our fish there.



This is one of the first places you should learn when you arrive in the area. Its better to get there early if you want the best choice, though it is good at any time of day.

9 comments:

Tornadoes28 said...

I think I have been here also. I went to a farmers market on the way back from Nasu in 2006 and this looks familiar. We bought a lot of fruit and vegetables.

modernnipponproject said...

Dear David Rolph-san


I'm contacting you on behalf of our website ModernNipponProject.com.

We are planning to renew our site and make it into a more advanced information platform for Japanese and foreigners coming to or living in Japan, to exchange useful information or find other people with the same experience in their area (since it is especially difficult for foreign residents who do not live in the big cities) and introduce the town they live in, its best spots and foods, post photos and articles.

We are looking for foreign residents in ALL Japanese prefectures and would love to hear their experiences and share them with others on our new interactive website, and we hope helpful and interesting discussions will come up in the course.

Maybe you would like to contribute a blog entry you wrote in the past, if the interactive concept is not your type. ANY sort of contribution or interaction would be greatly appreciated and we would be very grateful.

Our current site is not being updated while we are still in preparations for the brand new interactive information platform, but please do have a look and if you are interested in any of the ideas above, please do let us know and write us back.

We hope we can gather a lot of people and create cultural interaction on the new Modern Nippon Project site.

Thanks for reading and hoping to hear from you soon!

Yours kindly,
the members of the MNP team

ModernNipponProject.com

nani said...

Hi David,

My husband I are planning a trip to Tochigi and would like to spend the night at the Omuro Onsen Ryokan. Besides the bullet train, is there a local train service that goes there as well?

manuel said...

good photos :)

hirobot said...

I've had friends visiting Japan who complained about how expensive things are. Good to hear about the other side of the coin.

davidfromoz said...

Thanks for dropping by. Yes, Tokyo can be very expensive. And if you visit (especially for business) then thats likely where you'll spend most of your time.

But rural life seems very reasonable.

I think its possible to have a reasonable priced holiday too. Hokkaido by campground seems like a great choice (we should get round to blogging it).

真秀 said...

Very nice site. I've enjoyed learning about Tochigi!

The post on getting your driver's license was very informative..... Sounds a lot harder than here in the States. I don't think I would be able to do it.....

I have enjoyed your photographs throughout your site, you definitely have a good eye.

Thanks!

Matt

davidfromoz said...

Thanks Matt. Glad you enjoyed it.

Tochigi is a great place to visit, great place to live. (driver's license aside).

Hoeman said...

Thanks for posting the beautiful pictures. The farmers market is on route to Nasunogahara Park and the "Milk Farm", a long time attraction with entertainment for the kids. I always love visiting my Nasuhiobara and my in-laws. Having travelled through much of Asia, there's no place like home.